STONE GALLERY

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Eighteenth Century Maps

Measurements give image size. Condition reports are available by email or phone.

Sanson North America 1674. Item M1801: L’Amerique Septentrionale.
Nicolas Sanson d'Abbeville / Alexis-Hubert Jaillot / Covens and Mortier. Amsterdam, circa 1674 [1720]. 575 x 875 mm. [22-5/8 x 34-1/2 in.]
Prepared by Sanson, and issued in 1674 by Jaillot, this is a late re-issue (circa 1720) by Covens and Mortier with unchanged nomenclature. The river systems of the southeast are confused, for where the River Spiritu Sanctu [an early name for the Mississippi River] appears, there are virtually no Indian tribes placed. Instead, the tribes that are known to have been along the Mississippi are placed along the Chucagua R. One of these tribes, Quigualtanqui, is possibly the earliest form of nomenclature for the Natchez Indians. California appears as a huge island. This copy appears to be from the same plate as the 1692 Jaillot issue, with the date removed from the end of the title line, and from the imprint in the lower left cartouche. $3,500.
De Fer Southeast 1701. Item M1802: Les Costes aux Environs de la Riviere de Misisipi.
Nicolas De Fer. Paris, 1701. 215 x 335 mm. [8-1/2 x 13-1/8 in.]
Detailed engraved map of the lower Mississippi River Valley printed shortly after expeditions of La Salle in 1683 and d’Iberville in 1698. The cartouche depicts the assassination of La Salle. Printed fifteen years before the founding of Natchez and New Orleans, the nomenclature focuses entirely on the Indian tribes of the region. $2,200.
De Fer Southeast 1701. Item M1803: Les Costes aux Environs de la Riviere de Misisipi.
Nicolas De Fer. Paris, 1701. 215 x 335 mm. [8-1/2 x 13-1/8 in.] Margins cropped to the image.
Detailed engraved map of the lower Mississippi River Valley printed shortly after expeditions of La Salle in 1683 and d’Iberville in 1698. The cartouche depicts the assassination of La Salle. Printed fifteen years before the founding of Natchez and New Orleans, the nomenclature focuses entirely on the Indian tribes of the region. SOLD
De Fer World 1702. Item M1804: Mappe-Monde ou le Carte Universel.
Nicolas De Fer. Paris, 1702. 230 x 340 mm. [9 x 13-3/8 in.]
The Atlantic Ocean is named Mer du Nord, both in the region near the British Isles and in the Mid-Atlantic. South of the equator it is named Mer Meridionale. The North Sea is named Mer Glaciale, the Indian Ocean is named Mer Orientale, north of the equator appears Mer Pacifique but south of the equator it is name Mer du Sud. California appears as an island. North American nomenclature includes La Louisiane and Golfe de Mexique; S. Augustin and Floride; Sa. Fe, Nouveau Mexique and Californie I.; Quebec, Terre de Laborador, and Nouvelle France, Mexico [City] and Nouvelle Espagne. Framed. $900.
De L'Isle North America 1703. Item M1805: Carte du Mexique et de la Floride des Terres Angloises et des Isles Antilles du Cours et des Environs de la Riviere de Mississipi.
Guillaume De L'Isle. Paris, 1703/1708. 480 x 650 mm. [18-7/8 x 25-5/8 in.]
Employing a more scientific approach to cartography than most of his predecessors, De L’Isle authored an early foundation map for much of North America, Latin America and the Caribbean when he issued this important map. Villages des Natchez stands out clearly, referring to the Indian villages. ex John Reps Collection. $3,500.
Nolin North America 1704. Item M1806: Amerique Septentrionale.
Jean Baptiste Nolin. Paris, 1704. 450 x 595 mm. [17-3/4 x 23-1/2 in.]
A magnificent copperplate engraved map of North America, identical in all cartographic detail to Coronelli’s map of 1689, with changes only to contents of the cartouche, from which credit to Coronelli has been removed; and in a note in the lower left ocean area attributing authorship, P. Coronelli has been replaced with Le Sr. [Sieur] Nolin. The 1689 map credited both Coronelli, Venice, and J. B. Nolin, Paris. The possibility exists that the same plate was used for both maps with these minor credit alterations made for the 1704 edition. California appears as a gigantic island (Is. de Californie), and the northwest is left vaguely unfinished, hidden by the cartouche. The map is famous for the erroneous placement of the mouth of the Mississippi River, which empties into the Golfe du Mexique entirely too far to the west. Natchez appears in its earliest form of nomenclature Natche. SOLD
De Fer North America 1705. Item M1807: Le Canada, ou Nouvelle France.
Nicolas De Fer. Paris, 1705. 235 x 345 mm. [9-1/4 x 13-1/2 in.]
Natchez now appears as Natche 3 villages, still referring only to the Indian tribe since this map predates the founding of the town of Natchez. De Fer has expanded French claims as far east as possible, reducing English claims to areas along the Atlantic coast. The Mississippi River is charted flowing into the Gulf of Mexico entirely too far to the west, as was the French misconception around this time, though De L’Isle had already corrected this error by 1703. ex John Reps collection. $1,600.
De Fer Southeast 1705. Item M1808: Les Costes aux Environs de la Riviere de Misisipi.
Nicolas De Fer. Paris, 1705. 220 x 335 mm. [8-5/8 x 13-1/4 in.]
A later edition of the 1701 first edition, this detailed engraved map of the lower Mississippi River Valley was printed shortly after expeditions of La Salle in 1683 and d’Iberville in 1698. The date was altered on the original plate to read 1705, the map being unchanged from the 1701 issue. Printed before the founding of Natchez and New Orleans, the cartouche depicts the assassination of La Salle, and the nomenclature focuses entirely on Indian tribes of the region. SOLD
Aa Mississippi River 1707. Item M1809: Land en Volk-Ontdekking in’t Noorder gedeelte van America, door P. Marquette en Joliet; gedaan in’t Jaar 1673.
Pieter Van der Aa. Leiden, 1707. 220 x 290 mm. [8-3/4 x 11-1/2 in.]
As printed in the cartouche, this copperplate map is based on the 1673 relation of Marquette and Joliet, and a scene of the two explorers in a small boat on the river with two natives adorns the area left of the cartouche. Printed in two stages from two copperplates, the map does not perfectly align with the highly ornamental engraved ‘frame’ border. North is located at the left, providing a horizontal view of the Mississippi River [R. Missipy]. Based to some degree on the Coronelli model from 1688, the Mississippi River flows into the Golfo de Mexico too far west, nowhere near Lake Pontchartrain; yet Lake Pontchartrain, near where the river should be indicated, is named, after the Coronelli maps, with the name B. del Spiritu Santo (Spiritu Santo was a name for the great river on early maps). The site of Natchez is named Naiche 3 Villages. This nomenclature once again is derivative of the Coronelli model which named it Natche. A compass rose appears in the upper right corner to the right of Lake Pontchartrain on this highly unusual and rare map of the Mississippi River. SOLD
Aa Mississippi River 1707. Item M1810: Land en Volk-Ontdekking in’t Noorder gedeelte van America, door P. Marquette en Joliet; gedaan in’t Jaar 1673.
Pieter Van der Aa. Leiden, 1707. 220 x 290 mm. [8-3/4 x 11-1/2 in.] Margins cropped, mounted on thin tissue.
As printed in the cartouche, this copperplate map is based on the 1673 relation of Marquette and Joliet, and a scene of the two explorers in a small boat on the river with two natives adorns the area left of the cartouche. North is located at the left, providing a horizontal view of the Mississippi River [R. Missipy]. Based to some degree on the Coronelli model from 1688, the Mississippi River flows into the Golfo de Mexico too far west, nowhere near Lake Pontchartrain; yet Lake Pontchartrain, near where the river should be indicated, is named, after the Coronelli maps, with the name B. del Spiritu Santo (Spiritu Santo was a name for the great river on early maps). The site of Natchez is named Naiche 3 Villages. This nomenclature once again is derivative of the Coronelli model which named it Natche. A compass rose appears in the upper right corner to the right of Lake Pontchartrain on this highly unusual and rare map of the Mississippi River. SOLD
Aa Florida 1713. Item M1811: La Floride.
Pieter Van der Aa. Leiden, 1713/1714. 230 x 295 mm. [9 x 11-5/8 in.]
First issued in 1713, this copperplate engraved map is from Van der Aa’s Nouvel Atlas. Predating the founding of New Orleans and Natchez, this map is far more accurate than De Fer’s 1701 map Les Costes aux Environs... Derived from De L’Isle’s 1703 Carte du Mexique et de la Floride, with a cartouche featuring Native Americans and wildlife [including a lion!], great detail is shown from the Missouri River to the Carribbean, with Villages des Natchez very near the center of the map. SOLD
De L'Isle Southeast 1745. Item M1812: Carte de la Louisiane et du Cours du Mississipi.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Philipe Buache. Paris, 1718 [1745]. 485 x 650 mm. [19-1/8 x 25-1/2 in.]
Based on Guillaume De L’Isle’s landmark map of 1718, this later issue by family member Philipe Buache is essentially the same map. The cartographic improvements made in this map established it as the model for subsequent maps of the region. The first state of the 1718 issue lacked New Orleans; the city was added to the second state, which was the first map on which she appeared. SOLD
De Fer Southeast 1718. Item M1813: Partie Meridionale de La riviere de Missisipi.
Nicolas De Fer. Paris, 1718. 465 x 635 mm. [18-1/4 x 25 in.]
Issued in the same year as De L’Isle’s landmark map of the same region, De Fer’s map is not as accurate but is possibly the most beautiful depiction of this region ever produced. De Fer actually based his map on a De L’Isle manuscript dating from 1701 that De L’Isle himself never published. Decorated profusely with images of wildlife and Indians hunting and navigating the Gulf of Mexico, the southern part of the Mississippi River Valley is at the center. Natchez appears here as les Nadchez, still referring to the Indian tribe. Detailed in the area of present day Alabama are 44 Villages de la Nation des Chaquetas. Although lakes Pontchartrain and Maurepas are found, New Orleans is not. Of great interest and uniqueness on this map is the nomenclature on the Floridian Peninsula: Presqu’Isle de La Louisiane [Peninsula of Louisiana]. Here De Fer seems to be attempting to claim the peninsula for France, and the English possessions are mostly restricted to the Atlantic coastal areas. This is one of the earliest printed maps [likely second only to Edward Crisp’s map of circa 1711] to show the Carolina Trading Path from Charlestown all the way to the Mississippi River: Chemin que tienent les Anglois de la Caroline pour venir aux Chicachas. The routes of explorers are delineated as well. The detail of European forts and settlements, Indian nations and tribes, including pictorial representations of their villages, and topographical detail of rivers, lakes and mountains, make this one of the most desirable maps of the southeast for the collector. ex John Reps collection. $19,000.
Chatelain North America 1719. Item M1814: Carte Contenant le Royaume du Mexique et la Floride.
Henri Abraham Chatelain. Amsterdam, 1719. 405 x 520 mm. [16 x 20-1/2 in.]
Chatelain’s copperplate engraving is essentially the same map as De L’Isle’s 1703 Tabula Geographica Mexicae et Floridae &c, displaying North America from the Mid-Atlantic to the west coast [where California is included only partially, implying ambiguously that it may or may not be an island], and from the Great Lakes region in the north to the Isthmus of Panama and the northern part of South America. $2,600.
Chatelain Southeast 1719. Item M1815: Carte de la Nouvelle France.
Henri Abraham Chatelain. Amsterdam, 1719. 425 x 495 mm. [16-3/4 x 19-3/8 in.]
This beautiful copy of Chatelain’s colonial North America is very finely engraved, with tremendous detail of rivers and their tributaries, the Great Lakes system, the location of Indian tribes and other placenames with all nomenclature and comments in French. The top left corner inset provides stunning details of the Gulf Coast area of present day Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama; whereas the bottom right corner inset provides a map of the city of Quebec above with an elegant view of Quebec below, which includes a key to the most significant buildings of the city. The map is based on De Fer’s important 4-sheet map of the same region issued one year earlier. $3,400.
Chatelain Congo 1719. Item M1816: Vue & Description de la Ville de Lovango dans le Royaume de Congo avec Plusieurs Particularitez Curieuses Touchant les Moeurs & les Habillemens des Indiens du Pais.
Henri Abraham Chatelain. Amsterdam, 1719. 365 x 435 mm. [14-3/8 x 17 in.] + title lines.
This beautifully hand colored copperplate engraving respectfully provides elaborate details of Africans’ dress and customs, with an exceptionally detailed view of Lovango, a city of the Congo. $800.
Bowen English Road Maps 1720. Item M1817: Britannia Depicta.
Emanuel Bowen / John Owen. London, 1720 - 1764. 180 x 120 mm. [7 x 4-3/4 in.]
About 65 pieces. These road maps are extracted from Britannia Depicta or Ogilby Improved, and as such are re-engraved in a different style from the originals by John Ogilby, ‘inventor’ of the road map in Britain with his 1675 publication Britannia. The reason the Bowen issue was called ‘improved’ was primarily the reduction in size; the original Ogilby was a folio volume weighing 4-1/2 pounds, and was too cumbersome for travelers. Bowen also added family crests and textual details regarding the area represented on each map. A total of 13 issues were made from 1720 to 1764. All pieces are well matted. Most feature maps on both sides. $75 each.
Homann Southeast 1720. Item M1818: Amplissimae Regionis Mississipi Seu Provinciae Ludovicianae.
Johann Baptist Homann. Nuremberg, circa 1720. 490 x 580 mm. [19-1/4 x 22-3/4 in.]
"Amplissimae Regionis Mississippi seu Ludovicianae a R.P. Ludovico Hennepin francis. miss. in America Septentrionali Anno 1687 detectae nunc Gallorum coloniis et negotiis toto orbe celiberrimae. Nova tabula edita a Io. Bapt. Hommanno S.C.M. Geographo Norimbergae." A beautiful copy of this fine map, based on De L’Isle’s landmark map of 1718, with an elaborate cartouche at top left depicting Father Hennepin, who is credited in the cartouche with exploration of the region in 1687. Niagara Falls is also shown, and another scene presents natives and wildlife. Routes of explorers are traced, including those of De Soto, La Salle, Tonty, Bienville, and St. Denis. A second cartouche portrays a buffalo and a pelican. $3,600.
Homann Curious Map 1720. Item M1819: Das Caspische Meer Das Land Kamtzadalie sonst Jedso.
Johann Baptist Homann. Nuremberg, circa 1720. 490 x 580 mm. [19-1/4 x 22-7/8 in.]
In this copperplate engraved “curious exhibet” the Caspian Sea is juxtaposed beside Kamtzadalia and the Japanese Islands. In a beautifully engraved centerpiece, a sun-radiant eye of God peers down from above, watching over mankind immersed in his geographical studies, with an angel in the middle holding aloft a banner proclaiming "Ita tradimus, sicut accepimus" [thus handed down, thus accepted], while a group of angels bear aloft a central cartouche announcing "Geographica Nova / ex Oriente gratiosissima, / duabus tabulis specialissimis contenta, / quarum una / Mare Caspium, / altera / Kamtzadaliam seu Terram Jedso / curiose exhibet". $1,500.
De L'Isle North America 1722. Item M1820: Tabula Geographica Mexicae et Floridae &c.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Covens and Mortier. Amsterdam, 1722. 460 x 600 mm. [18 x 23-1/2 in.] + title.
Covens and Mortier re-engraved De L’Isle’s Carte du Mexique et de la Floride, des Terres Angloises et des Isles Antilles from the 1703 prototype without adding significant updates for their edition, explaining why New Orleans is absent. 'Villages des Natchez' is present however. SOLD
Schenk North America 1722. Item M1821: Tabula Mexicae et Floridae.
Pieter Schenk. Amsterdam, 1722. 490 x 610 mm. [19-1/4 x 24 in.]
"Terrarum Anglicarum, et anteriorum Americae Insularum; item cursuum et circuituum fluminis Mississipi dicti." [English Lands, and anterior American Islands; also the path and region of the Mississippi River shown.] This magnificently engraved map is by Pieter Schenk Jr. (1698-1775), who took over the publishing business of Pieter Schenk the elder after his death in 1715. It is a derivative of Guillaume De L’Isle’s 1703 landmark map Carte du Mexique et de la Floride, which uses French nomenclature. This Schenk issue retains some of the French nomenclature but changes others to Latin. Featuring early appearances of Pascaboula, Lacus Pontchartrain, les Natchitoches, and Pagus des Natchez [Region of the Natchez Indians], this is a fine derivative of De L’Isle’s map, issued the same year as Covens and Mortier’s version, and preceding Homann’s 1725 issue by 3 years and Lotter’s 1757 issue by 35 years. Where the map was issued numerous times by De L’Isle, Homann, and Lotter, it was issued only once by Schenk, making the Schenk 1722 issue rarer than the others. Although De L’Isle had mapped New Orleans by 1718, with Natchez appearing as a settlement rather than only an Indian district, this Schenk map omits New Orleans and represents Natchez as an Indian tribe since the map as a whole is a throwback to the earlier 1703 cartography. Unlike De L’Isle it retains Tegesta on the Florida peninsula from Delaet’s map c. 1630, named after an Indian tribe found on the southwest coast of Florida. $3,800.
NO PHOTO of Moll North America 1727. Item M1822: A Chart of ye West-Indies or the Islands of America in the North Sea &c.. Being ye Present Seat of War.
Herman Moll. London, circa 1727. 285 x 350 mm. [11-1/8 x 13-3/4 in.]
The Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic regions are depicted, with important locales of the North American coastline named, such as CharlesTown, Savana, Fort St. Augustin, Fort Pensacola, Fort Mobile, and Rosalie F. on the Mississippi River. Text entries at the bottom detail The Course of the Galleons, which are also traced and labeled on the map. SOLD
Moll Southeast 1728. Item M1823: Florida Called by ye French Louisiana.
Herman Moll. London, 1728/1732. 205 x 275 mm. [8 x 10-7/8 in.]
First appearing in 1728, the map was re-issued in 1732 with some updated information. 'Natches' appears on this map without any notation of its destruction in 1730. Yet New Orleans is absent, demonstrating the greater importance of Natchez over New Orleans in the earliest years of their settlement. “This is one of the early printed maps to give the roads and trading paths from Carolina westward” -(Cumming). The Florida peninsula is called Neck of Florida and a dotted border line drawn just above it is labeled Limit of King Charles the II Granted to the Present Proprietors of Carolina in 1663. Although routes of the French explorers are drawn, and some French nomenclature persists on this otherwise English map, the only place “Louisiana” appears is in the title, presented in a simple box cartouche at the bottom center of the map. Extracted from “Atlas Minor”, published by Thomas and John Bowles, London, 1732. Herman Moll, 1654-1732, was a Dutch emigre who came to London around 1680 and worked as an engraver, later starting his own business, becoming the foremost map publisher in England during the 1st quarter of the 18th century. SOLD
Moll Southeast 1728. Item M1824: Florida Called by ye French Louisiana.
Herman Moll. London, 1728/1732. 205 x 275 mm. [8 x 10-7/8 in.]
First appearing in 1728, the map was re-issued in 1732 with some updated information. 'Natches' appears on this map without any notation of its destruction in 1730. Yet New Orleans is absent, demonstrating the greater importance of Natchez over New Orleans in the earliest years of their settlement. “This is one of the early printed maps to give the roads and trading paths from Carolina westward” -(Cumming). The Florida peninsula is called Neck of Florida and a dotted border line drawn just above it is labeled Limit of King Charles the II Granted to the Present Proprietors of Carolina in 1663. Although routes of the French explorers are drawn, and some French nomenclature persists on this otherwise English map, the only place “Louisiana” appears is in the title, presented in a simple box cartouche at the bottom center of the map. Extracted from “Atlas Minor”, published by Thomas and John Bowles, London, 1732. Herman Moll, 1654-1732, was a Dutch emigre who came to London around 1680 and worked as an engraver, later starting his own business, becoming the foremost map publisher in England during the 1st quarter of the 18th century. SOLD
Homann Engraved Clock-Map 1730. Item M1825: Geographische Universal-Zeig und Schlag-Uhr.
Johann Baptist Homann. Nuremberg, circa 1730. 490 x 580 mm. [19-1/4 x 22-3/4 in.]
Copperplate engraving of a ‘universal clock’ numbered I to XII twice round, the globe in the center displays the north pole at center, on one side encircled by the sun and clouded skys of daylight and on the other by the starry heavens of night; further encircled by the months in Latin, signs of the zodiac and the Greek symbol of each. A lengthy German text flanks both sides of the image. $975.
Homann Celestial 1730. Item M1826: Hemisphaerium Coeli Australe.
Johann Baptist Homann. Nuremberg, circa 1730. 485 x 575 mm. [19 x 22-5/8 in.]
Produced by the leading German cartographer of the 18th century, this is one of a pair of copperplate engraved celestial maps, this one being of the southern heavens. $1,600.
Homann Celestial 1730. Item M1827: Hemisphaerium Coeli Boreale.
Johann Baptist Homann. Nuremberg, circa 1730. 485 x 580 mm. [19 x 22-7/8 in.]
Produced by the leading German cartographer of the 18th century, this is one of a pair of copperplate engraved celestial maps, this one being of the northern heavens. $1,600.
D'Anville Louisiana 1732. Item M1828: Carte de la Louisiane.
Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D'Anville. Paris, 1732/1752. 520 x 925 mm. [20-1/2 x 36-1/2 in.]
The map was prepared in May 1732 and published in 1752. This large scale, highly detailed map of the lower Mississippi River encompasses latitude 32o 50’ (la Grande Pointe coupee) to 29o (mouth of the Mississippi) and from Village des Natchitoches in the west to Apalachicola River in the east. The map was prepared just two years after the destruction of Natchez resulting from hostilities between Natchez Indians and French colonists. Detailed notations in that area document the sites that were ruined. A large inset map at the right details 'Partie Superieure de la Louisiane', tracking the area surrounding the Mississippi River from just below 33o (where the map proper ends) to above 40o, thereby including both 'Riv.’ des Missouris and Riv.’ des Ilinois'. SOLD
D'Anville Louisiana 1732. Item M1829: Carte de la Louisiane.
Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D'Anville. Paris, 1732/1752. 520 x 925 mm. [20-1/2 x 36-1/2 in.]
The map was prepared in May 1732 and published in 1752. This large scale, highly detailed map of the lower Mississippi River encompasses latitude 32o 50’ (la Grande Pointe coupee) to 29o (mouth of the Mississippi) and from Village des Natchitoches in the west to Apalachicola River in the east. The map was prepared just two years after the destruction of Natchez resulting from hostilities between Natchez Indians and French colonists. Detailed notations in that area document the sites that were ruined. A large inset map at the right details 'Partie Superieure de la Louisiane', tracking the area surrounding the Mississippi River from just below 33o (where the map proper ends) to above 40o, thereby including both 'Riv.’ des Missouris and Riv.’ des Ilinois'. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1830: Nuova Carta della Germania divisa in Dieci Circoli.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. 280 x 335 mm. [11-1/8 x 13-1/4 in.]
“A New Map of Germany divided into Ten Regions” is extracted from a Venetian edition of an atlas by the great 18th century French geographer Guillaume De L’Isle. Many of the maps in this volume, including this one, were prepared by Isaac Tirion of Amsterdam, information appearing in the cartouche. From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. MDCCXL. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1831: Mappamondo, o sia Descrizione Generale del Globo Terrestre ed Acquatico.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. 300 x 360 mm. [11-3/4 x 14-1/8 in.]
World map from a Venetian edition of an atlas by the great 18th century French geographer Guillaume De L’Isle. Extracted from Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo, nel quale sono Esattamente Descritti Gl’Imperi, Le Monarchie, Stati, Repubbliche, ec. del Sig. Guglielmo De L’Isle, Volume Primo; Al quale si premette la prima Parte della Introduzione alla Geografia. Del Sig. Sanson di Abbeville; Ove si spiegano i suoi principi, le varie maniere onde viene rappresentata, i suoi termini, e l’uso che si dee far delle Carte. A sua eccellenza il Sig. Cavaliere Pier Andrea Capello eletto Ambasciadore della Serenissima Repubblica di Venezia alla Sacra Imp. Measta’ di Carlo VI. In Venezia, nella Stamperia di Giambatista Albrizzi Q. Girol. MDCCXL. The northwest area of North America is left vaguely incomplete in acknowledgement of the lack of absolute knowledge of that region. $1,600.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1832: Nuova Carta del Polo Artico secondo l’ultime osservazioni.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
Map of the North Pole from a Venetian edition of an atlas by the great 18th century French geographer Guillaume De L’Isle. From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. North American placenames include Boston, N. York, C. Cod, Chesapeak S., Mariland, Virginia, Florida, Nuova Messico, Santa Fe, Ilinois, Kikapou, Missouri F., Missisipi F., California, S. Barbara F., P. S. Francis, and many more in Canada. California is depicted as an island. The northwest area of North America is left vaguely incomplete in acknowledgement of the lack of absolute knowledge of that region. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1833: Carta Nuova dell’ Europa secondo le ultime osservazioni fatta in Amsterdam appresso Isaa. Tirion.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $500.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1834: Nuova Carta dell Asia...
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1835: Nuova Carta dell’ Impero del Gran Mogol.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $450.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1836: Carta Accurata dell’ Imperio del Giappone.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1837: Carta Nuova dell’ Arabia.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 350 mm. [11-1/4 x 13-3/4 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $900.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1838: Nuova Carta del Regno di Svezia.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1839: Carta Nuova del Regno di Danimarca.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1840: Nuova Carta del Circolo di Baviera, edi Austria.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1841: Nuova Carta del Regno di Polonia Diviso nei suoi Palatinati.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1842: Nuova et Accurata Carta dell’Isole Filippine, Ladrones, e Moluccos, o Isole delle Speziarie come anco Celebes &c.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1843: Nuova Carta del Regno di Ungheria, e della Transilvania.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $275.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1844: Nuova Carta del Regno di Boemia, Ducato di Slesia, Marchesato di Moravia, e Lusazia.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1845: Nuova Carta del Circolo di Sassonia Superiore ovvero Sassonia, Misnia, Voigtland, Turingia, Anhalt, Lusazia, Brandenburg, e Pomerania &.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $250.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1846: Nuova Carta del Circolo di Sassonia Inferiore, che contiene li Paesi di Mekelenburg, Lavenburg, Holstein, Brema, e Verden, Bransuic, e Lunenburgo, Hanover, Hildesheim, Halberstad, e Magdenburg.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $250.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1847: Nuova Carta delle Contée di Fiandra, Artois, ed Hannonia.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $225.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1848: Nuova Carta del Circolo di Franconia, edi Svevia.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1849: Nuova Carta del Circolo di Westfalia diviso ne’suoi Vescovadi, Principati, Contée, &c.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $200.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1850: Carta Nuova ed Accurata delle XVII Provincie de’ Paesi Bassi.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1851: Nuova Carta dell’ India di la del Fiume Ganges overo di Malacca Siam Cambodia Chiampa Kochinchina Laos Pegu Ava &c.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $400.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1852: Nuova Carta delle Isole di Sunda come Borneo Sumatra e Iava Grande &c.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $400.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1853: Nuova Carta dell’ Isola Ceilon.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $475.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1854: Nuova Carta dell’ Imperio della China e dei Paesi circonvicini.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $275.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1855: Nuova Carta del Ducatodi Lucemburgo, e della Contèadi Namur.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $225.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1856: Nuova Carta del Ducato di Brabante, Limburgo, e della Gheldria Superiore.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $200.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1857: Nuova Carta della Moscovia o Russia.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $600.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1858: Nuova Carta della Tartaria.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $250.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1859: Nuova Carta del Europa Turchesca.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1860: Carta Nuova del Dominio, e Stati del Turco Situati Nell’Europa Asia ed Africa.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1861: Nuova Carta di Irak Arabi, Kurdistan Diarbek Turcomannia Siria, e Palestina.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. SOLD
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1862: Nuova Carta del Regno di Persia.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $275.
De L'Isle Atlas 1740. Item M1863: Nuova Carta de’ Circoli Superiore ed Inferiore del Reno annesso il Ducato di Lorena.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 330 mm. [11 x 13 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $65
NO PHOTO of De L'Isle Half Title. Item M1864: Atlante Novissimo Del Sig.r Guglielmo De L’Isle.
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 165 mm. [11 x 6-1/2 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $75.
NO PHOTO of De L'Isle Title Page. Item M1865: Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti Del Mondo...
Guillaume De L'Isle / Isaac Tirion. Venice, 1740. Approximately 280 x 165 mm. [11 x 6-1/2 in.]
From Atlante Novissimo che Contiene Tutte le Parti del Mondo. $65.
Homann Caribbean 1740. Item M1866: Mappa Geographica Complectens Indiae Occidentalis Carte des Isles de L’Amerique et de Plusiers Pays de Terre Ferme.
Homann Heirs / Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D'Anville. Nuremberg, circa 1740. 580 x 490 mm. [22-7/8 x 19-1/4 in.]
The central portion of this copperplate engraving features the Carribbean Islands and the Gulf of Mexico in a d’Anville map of 1731. The top and bottom feature inset maps of the Isthmus of Panama; St. Augustine, Florida; Vera Cruz, Mexico; Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; and a charming view of Mexico City. Homann’s Latin title at the top translates: Geographic Map comprising I. West Indies Around the Middle Part of the Isthmus of Panama II. The Isthmus itself III. Detailed graph of principal places & ports of these pertinent lands. All chosen from History of the Island of Santo Domingo & before the present state of war, which in 1740 is rising between England & Spain, to enlighten the public is offered by Homann Heirs. With Privilege S. Caes. Maj. $1,100.
Bellin Louisiana 1744. Item M1867: Carte de la Louisiane cours du Mississipi et Pais Voisins.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1744. 395 x 555 mm. [15-1/2 x 21-7/8 in.]
Based on De L’Isle’s landmark map of 1718, this is a finely engraved, highly detailed map of the eastern half of North America, reaching from the Great Lakes almost to the tip of Florida. This was a very accurate map for this period. SOLD
Seale Dendermonde 1744. Item M1868: Plan of the City of Dendermonde, and the manner in which it was blocked by the troops of the Allies.
Richard Seale. London, 1744. 365 x 470 mm. [14-1/4 x 18-1/2 in.] + title line at bottom.
A copperplate engraving from the first edition of Mr. Tindal’s Continuation of Rapin’s History of England, this piece maps the area around Dendermonde, Belgium, showing the fortifications of defense, and positions of the Allies. At lower left is a view of the city, and lower right includes a cartouche containing the key to locations and features of the area, such as gates to the city, surrounding inundations, and nearby villages. $150.
Bowen Southeast 1748. Item M1869: A New Map of Georgia with Part of Carolina, Florida and Louisiana.
Emanuel Bowen. London, 1748. 360 x 475 mm. [14-1/8 x 18-3/4 in.]
Copperplate engraved map presenting a large scale examination of the southeast from slightly west of the Mississippi River to the mid-Atlantic seaboard at Charlestown, South Carolina, it spans as far north as the 35th parallel south to the mouth of the Mississippi River. Title continuation reads: "Drawn from Original Draughts, assisted by the most approved Maps and Charts. Collected by Eman: Bowen Geographer to his Majesty." Tiny engraved trees dot most of the map surface. "GEORGIA" spans the entire width in the middle, seeming to claim the entire region for England, although smaller notations below it mark "Part of Louisiana" west of Mobile Bay and "Part of Florida" east of Mobile Bay. The great river is spelled "Mississipi", Natchez is called "Nautches lately destroyed by the French", and beneath it possibly the earliest naming of the Homochitto River appears as "Lalleman River". On the east side of the upper extent of the Mississippi River, above the confluence of the "Akansas River", two tiny engraved huts are labeled "Remainder of the Nautches", suggesting that survivors of the French massacre of the Natchez Indians have settled there. Dotted lines indicate the roads traversing the present day state of Georgia. $5,800.
NO PHOTO of Vaugondy MS River 1749. Item M1870: Cours du Mississipi et La Louisiane.
Robert de Vaugondy. Paris, 1749. 215 x 160 mm. [8-1/2 x 6-3/8 in.]
A mapping of the Mississippi River valley from the Great Lakes Region (including Lake Michigan and parts of Lake Huron and Lake Erie) to the Gulf of Mexico. France still claims all of the region as far east as and including Mobile Bay. The imprint in a simple box reads: “Cours du Mississipi et La Louisiane Par le Sr. Robert de Vaugondy, fils de Mr. Robert Geog. du Roi. Avec Privilege 1749.” This is followed by Echelle Lieues d’une heure. Vaugondy’s “...atlases merit a place in any collection, for they mark the transition from speculative cartography to exact observation on the ground.”- R.V. Tooley, ‘Maps and Map-makers’. SOLD
Kitchen Atlantic 1755. Item M1871: Map of the European Settlements in South America and on the Western Coast of Africa.
Thomas Kitchen. London, circa 1755. 325 x 450 mm. [12-3/4 x 17-5/8 in.]
Depicted are the Southern Ocean below the Atlantic, and the South Sea just off the west coast of the Americas, with the the Pacific west of South Sea. Small arrows dot the oceans indicating the direction of currents. Among the nomenclature on the African coast are Tooth Coast, Grain Coast and Gold Coast. SOLD
Bellin Carolina 1757. Item M1872: Carte de la Caroline et Georgie.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1757. 190 x 285 mm. [7-1/2 x 11-1/4 in.]
An especially appealing map, the Atlantic seaboard of Georgia and the Carolinas is shown, with fine detail of the inland regions. SOLD
Bellin Florida 1757. Item M1873: Carte de la Floride, de la Louisiane, et Pays Voisins.
Bellin, Jacques Nicolas. Paris, 1757. 220 x 305 mm. [8-3/4 x 12 in.]
Based on De L’Isle’s landmark map of 1718, this is a finely engraved, highly detailed map of the eastern half of North America, issued in a smaller format than Bellin’s original from 1744. The map reaches from the Great Lakes to the 28th parallel, including about one third of the Florida peninsula. This was a very accurate map for this period. Jacques Nicolas Bellin (1703-1772) spent over fifty years at the French Hydrographic Service where he was appointed the first “Ingenieur Hydrographe de la Marine”. During his term of office he was commissioned to carry out major surveys, first of the coasts of France and later of all the known coasts of the world. These tremendous undertakings resulted in the production of a very large number of sea charts of the highest quality which appeared in many editions with varying numbers of charts to the end of the century. He was appointed “Hydrographer to the King” and was a member of the Royal Society in London. SOLD
Lotter North America 1757. Item M1874: Mappa Geographica Regionem Mexicanam et Floridam...
Conrad Lotter. Augsberg, circa 1757. 480 x 580 mm. [18-7/8 x 22-7/8 in.]
Terrasque adjacentes, ut et Anteriores Americae Insulas, Cursus itidem et Reditus Navigantium versus flumen Missisipi et alias Colonias ob oculos ponens, cura et sumptibus Tobiae Conradi Lotteri, Geographi et Chalcographi Augustae Vindel. Although a derivative of Guillaume De L’Isle’s 1703 landmark map Carte du Mexique et de la Floride, which uses French nomenclature, this later issue by Conrad Lotter emulates the 1722 version by Pieter Schenk, retaining some of the French nomenclature but changing others to Latin. Featuring early appearances of Pascaboula, Lacus Pontchartrain, les Natchitoches, and Pagus des Natchez [Region of the Natchez Indians], the map omits New Orleans and represents Natchez only as an Indian tribe since the map as a whole is a throwback to the earlier 1703 cartography. Based on Guillaume De L’Isle’s 1703 landmark map "Carte du Mexique et de la Floride", which uses French nomenclature, this later issue by Conrad Lotter retains some of the French nomenclature but changes others to Latin. Featuring early appearances of "Pascaboula", "Lacus Pontchartrain", "les Natchitoches", and "Pagus des Natchez" [Region of the Natchez Indians], the map omits New Orleans and represents Natchez only as an Indian tribe since the map as a whole is a throwback to the earlier 1703 cartography. SOLD
Bowen North America 1760. Item M1875: A Map of the New Continent according to its greatest diametrical Length from the River la Plata to beyond the Lake of the Assiniboils.
Emanuel Bowen / John Gibson. London, circa 1760. 215 x 175 mm. [8-3/8 x 6-7/8 in.]
Engraved by John Gibson, this map of the Western Hemisphere was printed in Atlas Minimus, issued by printer Emanuel Bowen in 1758. Despite the small scale of this map, Natchez appears on it, and is represented in its earliest form of nomenclature as first used in the late 17th century by Coronelli and others [Natche]. $550. Framed.
NO PHOTO of Lotter Chart. Item M1876: Tabula Anemographica seu Pyxis Nautica, vulgo Compass Charte.
Lotter, Conrad. Augsberg, circa 1760. 500 x 575 mm. [19-5/8 x 22-3/4 in.]
Four vignettes from different civilizations adorn the corners of this magnificently engraved compass, which shows 32 compass points, each with its associated wind, each wind being represented by a windhead. SOLD
Bellin MS River 1764. Item M1877: Embouchures du Fleuve St. Louis ou Mississipi.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1764. 215 x 170 mm. [8-1/2 x 6-3/4 in.]
This engraved map of the mouth of the Mississippi River details the islands and passes where the great river flows into the Golphe du Mexique. Tiny illustrations show the accumulation of logs washed down and lodged in the silt deposits of shallow waters. Soundings of the passes are given. From Le Petit Atlas Maritime. SOLD
Bellin MS Riaver 1764. Item M1878: Cours du Fleuve Saint Louis depuis ses Embouchures jusqu’a la Riviere d’Iberville et Costes Voisines.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1764. 220 x 355 mm. [8-5/8 x 14 in.]
Bellin’s engraved map of the southeast depicts the mouth of the Mississippi River [Fleuve Saint Louis ou Missisipi], from Riviere d’Iberville to Baye de la Mobile in the north, to the southernmost pass of the River’s spill into Golphe du Mexique. Nouvelle Orleans and Lac Pontchartrain are prominently featured. $925.
Bellin Pensacola 1764. Item M1879: Plan de la Baye de Pensacola dans la Floride.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1764. 215 x 170mm. [8-1/2 x 6-3/4 in.]
North is situated to the left on this colonial map of Pensacola. The town is clearly a very small settlement, with Fort St. Charles shown nearby, and Fort de Ste Rose across the bay on Isle de Ste Rose. The soundings of the bay are shown, and a number of rivers and Bayouc empty into it. $750.
Bellin Philadelphia 1764. Item M1880: Plan de Philadelphie et Environs.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1764. 210 x 165 mm. [8-1/4 x 6-1/2 in.]
Based on the 1752 Scull & Heap map, this pre-revolutionary map of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, showing the Ville de Philadelphie between Riviere de Delavare and Riviere Schuylkill, finely details the surrounding region displaying hills, trees, creeks, buildings, and villages. $950.
Bellin St. Laurence 1764. Item M1881: Partie du Fleuve St. Laurent depuis Quebec jusqu’au Lac St. Francois. Carte du Lac Champlain.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1764. 210 x 315 mm. [8-1/4 x 12-1/2 in.]
A highly detailed charting of the St. Lawrence River from Montreal to Quebec comprises the top half of the sheet. Below is a separate map of Lake Champlain in present day New York State. $475.
Bellin Charles-Town 1764. Item M1882: Port et Ville de Charles-Town dans la Caroline.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1764. 215 x 150 mm. [8-1/2 x 6 in.]
North is to the right on this very bold representation of the fortification of Charleston, South Carolina, situated on Riviere Ashley and Riviere Cooper, with Fort Johnson detailed across the bay. $900.
Bellin Mississippi River 1764. Item M1883: Suite du Cours du Fleuve St. Louis depuis la Riviere d’Iberville jusqua celle des Yasous et les Parties connues de la Riviere Rouge et la Riviere Noire.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1764. 220 x 350 mm. [8-5/8 x 13-3/4 in.]
This wonderfully detailed map of the Natchez and Natchitoches regions is from the Petit Atlas Maritime. It features a large scale, highly detailed inset at the lower left of Natchitoches, surmounted by a separate cartouche reading Carte de L’Etablissement Francois sur la Riviere Rouge. A notation at Natchez points out that Natchez was destroyed in 1730 when it was a French settlement, and northwest is a note marking Fort des Natchez, destroyed in 1731. The Mississippi river is labeled Cours du Fleuve S. Louis ou Mississipi. A caption at bottom center details the character of the Red River, claiming wildlife found in its environs includes such beasts as crocodiles [actually alligators], tigers, wolves, and mentions the growth of wild fruits and vines which produce muscats and other grapes. SOLD
Bellin New Orleans 1764. Item M1884: Plan de la Nouvelle Orleans.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1764. 210 x 230 mm. [8-1/4 x 11-3/4 in.]
A wonderfully detailed copperplate engraving of the French Quarter, with a list of keys at the top, showing beautifully engraved turbulent waters of the Mississippi below. Included in the keys are Place d’Armes, Convent des Capucins, Prisons, Urselines and Magasins du Roi. $1,050.
Bellin New England 1764. Item M1885: Carte de la Nouvelle Angleterre New York Pensilvanie et Nouveau Jersay.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1764. 325 x 375 mm. [12-3/4 x 14-3/4 in.]
A classic representation of New England as first laid out in the 17th century, this map still shows the influence of the extremely important maps by Willem Blaeu (1635) and Joannes Janssonius (1651). Reaching from Delaware Bay to Penobscot Bay, the three great East Coast cities Philadelphie, N. York and Baston are located. $950.
Bellin Mississippi River 1764. Item M1886: Suite du Cours du Fleuve St. Louis depuis la Riviere d’Iberville jusqua celle des Yasous et les Parties connues de la Riviere Rouge et la Riviere Noire.
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. Paris, 1764. 220 x 350 mm. [8-5/8 x 13-3/4 in.]
This wonderfully detailed map of the Natchez and Natchitoches regions is from the Petit Atlas Maritime. It features a large scale, highly detailed inset at the lower left of Natchitoches, surmounted by a separate cartouche reading Carte de L’Etablissement Francois sur la Riviere Rouge. A notation at Natchez points out that Natchez was destroyed in 1730 when it was a French settlement, and northwest is a note marking Fort des Natchez, destroyed in 1731. The Mississippi river is labeled Cours du Fleuve S. Louis ou Mississipi. A caption at bottom center details the character of the Red River, claiming wildlife found in its environs includes such beasts as crocodiles, tigers, wolves, and mentions the growth of wild fruits and vines which produce muscats and other grapes. SOLD
Jefferys Mouth of Mississippi 1764. Item M1887: The Entrance of the River Missisipi at Fort Balise Taken in the King’s Ship Nautilus in the Year 1764.
Robert Sayer. London, circa 1764. 175 x 225 mm. [6-7/8 x 8-3/4 in.]
The mouth of the Mississippi River at the Fort Balise pass is shown in detail. Feathered arrows indicate the direction of current. Tiny engraved images of drift wood are explained as Heaps of Trees which have formed the Bank. Soundings are given in both Roman numerals for fathoms and Arabic figures for feet. SOLD
Tirion New Orleans 1769. Item M1888: Grondvlakte van Nieuw Orleans, de Hoofdstad van Louisiana.
Isaac Tirion. Amsterdam, 1769. 330 x 455 mm. [13 x 17-7/8 in.]
There are three maps on this sheet, the largest being of New Orleans. The smaller ones are of the mouth of the Mississippi River flowing into the Gulf of Mexico and a closeup of the east passage detailing the Fort la Balise. $1,600.
Zatta Midwest 1769. Item M1889: Il Paese de’ Selvaggi Outagamiani, Mascoutensi, Illinesi, e parte delle VI. Nazioni.
Antonio Zatta. Venice, 1769. 320 x 425 mm. [12-5/8 x 16-5/8 in.] + title line.
Beautiful Italian copperplate engraved map of the upper Mississippi River and Lake Michigan regions. $1,250.
Bonne Canada 1771. Item M1890: Canada IIe Feuille.
Rigobert Bonne. Paris, 1771. 290 x 435 mm. [11-1/2 x 17 in.]
The title means Canada Second Page; (the first page would depict the western part of North America). This very attractive copperplate engraved map of the eastern half of North America was issued on the eve of the American Revolution. It designates the destruction of Natchez in 1730. Rigobert Bonne was born 1727 and died 1795 in France. He was a noted engineer and cartographer who produced atlases in Paris from 1762 to 1788. His atlas Globe was produced in 1771. SOLD
Sayer MS River 1775. Item M1891: Course of the River Mississipi, from the Balise to Fort Chartres; Taken on an Expedition to the Illinois, in the latter end of the Year 1765.
Robert Sayer. London, 1775. 1120 x 345 mm. [44-1/8 x 13-5/8 in.]
The 1775 issue is the second state of the map, which added certain placenames that were absent on the first issue of 1772 such as Fort St. Leon and Fort St. Mary. The credits read: "By Lieut. Ross of the 34th Regiment: Improved from the Surveys of that River made by the French." One of the largest scale maps produced in the 18th century of the lower Mississippi River Valley, it is also one of the visually most striking. Notations appearing here include Ft Natchez or Rosalia Destroy’d, Hermitage, Saint Catherines destroy’d by the Natchez in 1729, Little River, Duck River, Natchez destroy’d by the French in 1730, very good land, the Clifts of Natchez, etc. The Meridian of New Orleans runs the entire length of the map near the center. $7,800.
Sayer MS River 1772. Item M1892: Course of the River Mississipi, from the Balise to Fort Chartres; Taken on an Expedition to the Illinois, in the latter end of the Year 1765.
Robert Sayer. London, 1772. 1120 x 345 mm. [44-1/8 x 13-5/8 in.]
The 1772 issue is the first state of the map, and lacks certain placenames that appeared on the second issue of 1775 such as Fort St. Leon and Fort St. Mary. The credits read: "By Lieut. Ross of the 34th Regiment: Improved from the Surveys of that River made by the French." One of the largest scale maps produced in the 18th century of the lower Mississippi River Valley, it is also one of the visually most striking. Notations appearing here include Ft Natchez or Rosalia Destroy’d, Hermitage, Saint Catherines destroy’d by the Natchez in 1729, Little River, Duck River, Natchez destroy’d by the French in 1730, very good land, the Clifts of Natchez, etc. The Meridian of New Orleans runs the entire length of the map near the center. SOLD
Zatta US 1778. Item M1893: Luigiana Inglese, colla Parte Occidentale della Florida, della Giorgia, e Carolina Meridonale.
Antonio Zatta. Venice, 1778. 330 x 420 mm. [13 x 16-1/2 in.]
Printed from copperplate in Venice in the midst of the American Revolution, this is a large scale rendition of the southeast from slightly west of the Mississippi River to longitude 295, ending short of the Atlantic seaboard. Extending as far north as present day Tennessee and as far south as the mouth of the Mississippi, extensive detail of Indian tribe locations, merchant routes, rivers and waterways is provided. Even at the late date of 1778 a notation states that Fort Rosalie was destroyed, and Natchez is spelled Nattchees, with a notation that it was destroyed by the French in 1730. Additional notations include Quivi Ferdinando Soto scopri la prima volta il Missisipi [sic][Here Ferdinand de Soto discovered for the first time the Mississippi.] SOLD
Bonne NA 1781. Item M1894: Le Nouveau Mexique avec le Partie Septentrionale de L’Ancien ou de la Nouvelle Espagne.
Rigobert Bonne. Paris, 1781. 215 x 320 mm. [8-1/2 x 12-5/8 in.]
This copperplate engraving of the lower half of North America depicts from the Baja Peninsula in the west to just short of the Florida Peninsula. Great detail is given in the area of Mexico and the southwest. Considerable detail is also shown in the lower Mississippi River Valley and the areas of present day Louisiana and Texas. "Natchés détruits" is shown along the "Mississipi Fl". SOLD
Dilly England 1785. Item M1895: An Accurate Map of England and Wales with The Principal Roads from the best Authorities.
Dilly and Robinson. London, 1785. 350 x 330 mm. [13-3/4 x 13 in.]
Framed, from Altman’s art shop. An early road map of England and Wales. $400.
D'Anville Louisiana 1788. Item M1896: Map of Louisiana, from D’Anville’s Atlas.
Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D'Anville. London, 1788. 310 x 500 mm. [12-1/4 x 19-5/8 in.]
A fascinating close-up of the lower Mississippi River Valley and Mobile River Valley, this copperplate was delicately engraved by Emanuel Bowen for John Harrison of Newgate Street, London, dated April 19 1788. This is a reduced (about 50%) English version of D’Anville’s map of 1732/1752, providing the exact English translations of D’Anville’s historical references in French, such as Village of the Natches in Ruins, St. Catharine destroy’d by the Ind.ns 1729, Fort of the Natches destroy’d in Jany 1731, and Shaking Marshes [southeast of New Orleans at the mouth of the Mississippi]. An inset at the right provides fine details of Upper Louisiana, including considerable detail along the Missouris and Ilinois rivers. SOLD
Bonne US 1790. Item M1897: Les États Unis de L’Amérique Septentrionale, Partie Occidentale.
Rigobert Bonne. Paris, circa 1790. 355 x 235 mm. [14 x 9-1/4 in.]
This copperplate engraving of the Mississippi River basin depicts from Lac Superieur in the north to the Gulf of Mexico. Great detail is given in the area east of the river and around the Great Lakes area. Rosalie and Natachez are both used to label Natchez, with Ft. des Natches located on the west side of Missisipi Fl. Just east of Natchez appears the notation les Cannes Jaunes (the Yellow Cane [fields]). The paper features a large ornate watermark nearly centered. SOLD
SDUK? NA 1797. Item M1898: A General Map of North America From the best Authorities.
SDUK(?) London, circa 1797. 195 x 230 mm. [7-3/4 x 9 in.]
The North American continent is depicted near the end of the 18th century (circa 1797) in this copperplate engraving. Published in London only about two decades after the American Revolution, the map makes no British claims in the area of the United States. The area west of the Mississippi River was not yet explored, and the regions there are simply called “Louisiana” or “New Mexico”. SOLD
Cassini Virginia/Carolina 1797. Item M1899: Gli Stati Uniti Dell’ America... Parte della Virginia e della Carolina.
Giovanni Cassini. Rome, 1797. 340 x 475 mm. [13-1/4 x 18-5/8 in.]
With the Mississippi River, the Ohio River and Lake Erie included, the beautiful full color cartouche at lower left is the highlight of this engraving produced by Calcografia Camerale. Framed. $1400.
NO PHOTO of Wilkes US 1797. Item M18100: United States of America.
Wilkes, J. London, 1797. 185 x 240 mm. [7-1/4 x 9-1/2 in.]
A very detailed map of the United States before the turn of the 19th century from British Colonies in North America. Numerous Indian lands are designated, including Chactaws, Chicksaws, Chipawas, Miamis, Nadowessis, Utawas, etc. Georgia reaches all the way to the Mississippi River, and below the 31st parallel are West Florida and East Florida. In the region of present day State of Mississippi are found Big Town of the Chicksaws and the Creeks. Although Natchez is not on this map, Coles Creek is located at the site. SOLD
Cassini Celestial Gores 1792. Item M18101: Globo Celeste.
Giovanni Cassini. Rome, 1792. Each 500 x 340 mm. [19-3/4 x 13-1/4 in.]
Five Engraved sheets sold as a set. This stunning set of globe gores for the Celestial Globe was engraved by Giovanni Maria Cassini and published on double-page sheets by Calcografia Camerale in Rome near the end of the 18th century. One sheet bears the endpieces for the globe, and circumference markers displaying months of the year, signs of the zodiac, and longitudinal degrees of the sphere, with windheads and other decorations. The other four sheets have three segments each, for a total of 12 gores displaying the constellations in striking detail with numerous notations and labels.
A small cartouche at the center of the first sheet credits Flamsteed for the celestial observations. The Englishman John Flamsteed (1646-1719) served as the first Astronomer Royal of England, appointed in 1675 by King Charles II, who in that same year founded the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. Flamsteed was given the honor of laying the foundation stone of the new observatory. He is credited with cataloging over 3000 stars. $7,200.
Cassini Celestial Gores 1792. Item M18101: Globo Celeste.
Cassini Celestial Gores 1792. Item M18101: Globo Celeste.
Cassini Celestial Gores 1792. Item M18101: Globo Celeste.
Cassini Celestial Gores 1792. Item M18101: Globo Celeste.
Weigel Southeast 1734. Item M18102: Novissima Tabula Regionis Ludovicianae Gallice dictae la Louisiane.
Christoph Weigel. Nuremberg, 1734. 312 x 412 mm. [12-1/2 x 16-1/2 in.]
Modeled after De L'Isle's 1718 map of the Southeast, this map first appeared in 1720 accompanying a promotion to sell shares in Germany of John Law's 'Compagnie de la Louisiane d'Occident' which was based in Paris. A financial bubble developed around this company which collapsed in November 1720, forcing John Law to flee Paris. The cartouche depicts a couple of investors standing over a chest of coins, with a crumbling classical column above. $3,600.
Santini Southeast 1776. Item M18103: Partie Meridionale de la Louisiane, avec la Floride, la Caroline et la Virginie.
P. Santini. Venice, 1776. 475 x 570 mm. [19 x 22-3/4 in.]
Although the map is derived from D'Anville's 1746 map of North America, Santini has added updates bringing it up to the time of the 1776 American Revolution, the year this map was printed. $2,400.
Probst Eastern North America 1782. Item M18104: Nova Mappa Geographica Americae Septentrionalis.
Johann Michael Probst. Augsberg, 1782. 500 x 480 mm. [20 x 19-1/4 in.]
This map is based on the Le Rouge edition of Henry Popple's key map of 1733. Insets along the right edge show New York, Boston, St. Augustine, Havana, Charles Town, Bermuda, Providence, Santiago, Kingston, Port Royal-Martinique, Barbados, Antigua, Cartagena, Porto Bello and others. $5,200.
De L'Isle Florida 1740. Item M18105: Carta Geographica della Florida, nell'America Settentrionale.
Guillaume De L'Isle / [Albrizzi]. Venice, 1740. 330 x 430 mm. [13 x 17 in.]
Published by Girolamo Albrizzi, this engraved map of southeast North America is from a Venetian edition of an atlas by the great 18th century French geographer Guillaume De L'Isle. The map is nearly the same as De L'Isle's landmark map of the southeast from 1718. The beautifully engraved vignette depicts natives aiming arrows at lions with antlered deer in the scene as well. Handsomely framed. $1,800.
Bonne Nouveau Mexique 1781. Item M18106: Le Nouveau Mexique avec le Partie Septentrionale de L'Ancien ou de la Nouvelle Espagne.
Rigobert Bonne. Paris, 1781. 215 x 320 mm. [8-1/2 x 12-5/8 in.]
This copperplate engraving of the lower half of North America depicts from the Baja Peninsula in the west to just short of the Florida Peninsula. Great detail is given in the area of Mexico and the southwest. Considerable detail is also shown in the lower Mississippi River Valley and the areas of present day Louisiana and Texas. "Natchés détruits" is shown along the "Mississipi Fl". SOLD
Bonne Southeast 1781. Item M18107: Carte de la Louisiane, et de la Floride.
Rigobert Bonne. Paris, 1781. 326 x 210 mm. [12-3/4 x 8-3/8 in.]
This copperplate engraving of the southeast of North America depicts from just west of the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast of present day South Carolina, including the entire Florida peninsula. An inset at lower left shows continuation of the Missouri River westward. Considerable detail is shown in the lower Mississippi River Valley in the areas of present day Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia. 'Rosalie' and 'Natchez' are both used to label Natchez, with 'F. des Natchez' located on the west side of 'Missisipi Fl' [sic]. Just east of Natchez appears the notation 'les Cannes Jaunes' (the Yellow Cane [fields]. SOLD
Item M18108: Karte von Luisiana, dem Laufe des Mississipi und den benachbarten Laendern...
Jacques Nocolas Bellin. Leipzig, 1744/1758. 395 x 560 mm. [15-1/2 x 22-1/4 in.]
A German text edition by Bellin of De L'Isles's famous southeast map covering most of the eastern half of North America from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. European colonies and possessions along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts are depicted along with Indian Lands. This 1758 issue appeared in the German edition of L'Abbe Prevost's encyclopedic collection of travelers' and explorers' reports, called 'Allgemeine Histoire Der Reisen Zu Wasser Und Zu Lande'. Numerous Indian names appear and major routes in the south are designated. $3,000.
Item M18109: Carte de la Louisiane.
Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D'Anville. Paris, 1732/1752. 520 x 925 mm. [20-1/2 x 36-1/2 in.]
The map was prepared in May 1732 and published in 1752. This large scale, highly detailed map of the lower Mississippi River encompasses latitude 32o 50’ (la Grande Pointe coupee) to 29o (mouth of the Mississippi) and from Village des Natchitoches in the west to Apalachicola River in the east. The map was prepared just two years after the destruction of Natchez resulting from hostilities between Natchez Indians and French colonists. Detailed notations in that area document the sites that were ruined. A large inset map at the right details 'Partie Superieure de la Louisiane', tracking the area surrounding the Mississippi River from just below 33o (where the map proper ends) to above 40o, thereby including both 'Riv.’ des Missouris and Riv.’ des Ilinois'. $4,200.
Item M18110: Luigiana Inglese, colla Parte Occidentale della Florida, della Giorgia, e Carolina Meridonale.
Antonio Zatta. Venice, 1778. 330 x 420 mm. [13 x 16-1/2 in.]
Printed from copperplate in Venice in the midst of the American Revolution, this is a large scale rendition of the southeast from slightly west of the Mississippi River to longitude 295, ending short of the Atlantic seaboard. Extending as far north as present day Tennessee and as far south as the mouth of the Mississippi, extensive detail of Indian tribe locations, merchant routes, rivers and waterways is provided. Even at the late date of 1778 a notation states that Fort Rosalie was destroyed, and Natchez is spelled Nattchees, with a notation that it was destroyed by the French in 1730. Additional notations include Quivi Ferdinando Soto scopri la prima volta il Missisipi [sic][Here Ferdinand de Soto discovered for the first time the Mississippi.] $950.
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